Running A Total Knot

Running A Total Knot

Support the Bitcoin network by running your own utter knot

What Is A Utter Knot?

A utter knot is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all total knots also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other total knots, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further total knots.

Most utter knots also serve lightweight clients by permitting them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough knots perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.

Many people and organizations volunteer to run total knots using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to permit Bitcoin to proceed to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.

Costs And Warnings

Running a Bitcoin utter knot comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can determine whether you’re able to help the network.

Special Cases

Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the total knots they use, so they will often run their own total knots and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a utter knot to help support the Bitcoin network in general.

Please seek out assistance in the community if you need help setting up your utter knot correctly to treat high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks. Do your own diligence to ensure who you get help from is ethical, reputable and qualified to assist you.

Secure Your Wallet

It’s possible and safe to run a utter knot to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.

Minimum Requirements

Bitcoin Core utter knots have certain requirements. If you attempt running a knot on feeble hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use knot.

Desktop or laptop hardware running latest versions of Windows, Mac OS X, or Linux.

145 gigabytes of free disk space

Two gigabytes of memory (RAM)

A broadband Internet connection with upload speeds of at least four hundred kilobits (50 kilobytes) per 2nd

An unmetered connection, a connection with high upload thresholds, or a connection you regularly monitor to ensure it doesn’t exceed its upload thresholds. It’s common for total knots on high-speed connections to use two hundred gigabytes upload or more a month. Download usage is around twenty gigabytes a month, plus around an extra one hundred forty gigabytes the very first time you begin your knot.

6 hours a day that your total knot can be left running. (You can do other things with your computer while running a total knot.) More hours would be better, and best of all would be if you can run your knot continuously.

Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) come in a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.

Possible Problems

Bandwidth thresholds: Some Internet plans will charge an extra amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.

Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run Bitcoin Core. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.

Attack target: Bitcoin Core powers the Bitcoin peer-to-peer network, so people who want to disrupt the network may attack Bitcoin Core users in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that boundaries your available download bandwidth.

Linux Instructions

The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.

Ubuntu 16.Ten

*Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.14.Two

If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to embark the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:

Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.

Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Private Package Archive (PPA) to your system:

You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to proceed. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:

Press come in to proceed. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the guideline line prompt:

Type the following line to get the most latest list of packages:

A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.

To proceed, choose one of the following options

To install the Bitcoin Core Graphical User Interface (GUI), type the following line and proceed to the Bitcoin Core GUI section below:

To install the Bitcoin Core daemon (bitcoind), which is useful for programmers and advanced users, type the following line and proceed to the Bitcoin Core Daemon section below:

To install both the GUI and the daemon, type the following line and read both the GUI instructions and the daemon instructions. Note that you can’t run both the GUI and the daemon at the same time using the same configuration directory.

After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press come in to proceed.

Bitcoin Core GUI

To begin Bitcoin Core GUI, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to open the Dash, type bitcoin , and click the Bitcoin icon.

You will be prompted to choose a directory to store the Bitcoin block chain and your wallet. Unless you have a separate partition or drive you want to use, click Ok to use the default.

Bitcoin Core GUI will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several days, and it may take much more time on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time by closing it; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you begin it.

After download is accomplish, you may use Bitcoin Core as your wallet or you can just let it run to help support the Bitcoin network.

Optional: Begin Your Knot At Login

Kicking off your knot automatically each time you login to your computer makes it effortless for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to tell Bitcoin Core GUI to begin at login.

While running Bitcoin Core GUI, open the Settings menu and choose Options. On the Main tab, click Begin Bitcoin on system login. Click the Ok button to save the fresh settings.

The next time you login to your desktop, Bitcoin Core GUI will be automatically commenced in as an icon in the tray.

You have now ended installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.

To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to permit incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.

Bitcoin Core Daemon

If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an accomplished administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)

From the terminal, type:

It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is embarking. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the instruction bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin guideline line interface).

Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to begin, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli :

After it starts, you may find the following guidelines useful for basic interaction with your knot: getblockchaininfo , getnetworkinfo , getnettotals , getwalletinfo , stop , and help .

For example, to securely stop your knot, run the following guideline:

A accomplish list of directions is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.

When Bitcoin Core daemon very first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several days, and it may take much more time on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop instruction; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you embark it.

Optional: Commence Your Knot At Boot

Commencing your knot automatically each time your computer boots makes it effortless for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to begin Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following instruction:

Scroll to the bottom of the file displayed and add the following line:

Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically embarked each time your reboot your computer.

If you’re an Ubuntu pro and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.

You have now finished installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.

To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to permit incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.

Other Linux Distributions

*Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.14.Two

The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core using contraptions available in most mainstream Linux distributions. We assume you use a Bourne-like shell such as bash .

Using any computer, go to the Bitcoin Core download page and verify you have made a secure connection to the server.

In the “Linux (tgz)” section of the Download page, choose the adequate file for your Linux install (either 32-bit or 64-bit) and download the file. If necessary, budge the file to the computer you want to use to run Bitcoin Core.

Optional: Verify the release signatures

If you know how to use PGP, you should also click the Verify Release Signatures link on the download page to download a signed list of SHA256 file hashes. The 0.11 and later releases are signed by Wladimir J. van der Laan’s releases key with the fingerprint:

Earlier releases were signed by Wladimir J. van der Laan’s regular key. That key’s fingerprint is:

Even earlier releases were signed by Gavin Andresen’s key. His primary key’s fingerprint is:

You should verify these keys belong to their owners using the web of trust or other trustworthy means. Then use PGP to verify the signature on the release signatures file. Eventually, use PGP or another utility to compute the SHA256 hash of the archive you downloaded, and ensure the computed hash matches the hash listed in the verified release signatures file.

If you aren’t already logged into the computer you want to install Bitcoin on, login now. Make sure you use an account that can use su or sudo to install software into directories wielded by the root user.

If you logged in graphically, commence a terminal. If you logged in another way, we will assume you’re already in a shell.

Locate the file you downloaded and extract it using the tar guideline followed by the argument xzf followed by the file name. The argument xzf means eXtract the gZipped tar archive File. For example, for a 64-bit tar archive in your current directory, the guideline is:

This will create the directory bitcoin-0.14.Two within your current working directory. We will install the contents of its bin subdirectory into the /usr/local/bin directory using the the install guideline. The install directive is part of the GNU coreutils available on almost every Linux distribution, and the /usr/local/bin directory is a standard location for self-installed executables (you may edit the directives below to use a different location).

If you use sudo to run directives as root, use the following instruction line:

If you use su to run directives as root, use the following guideline line:

To proceed, choose one of the following options

To use Bitcoin Core Graphical User Interface (GUI), proceed to the Bitcoin Core GUI section below.

To use the Bitcoin Core daemon (bitcoind), which is useful for programmers and advanced users, proceed to the Bitcoin Core Daemon section below.

To use both the GUI and the daemon, read both the GUI instructions and the daemon instructions. Note that you can’t run both the GUI and the daemon at the same time using the same configuration directory.

Bitcoin Core GUI

In order to use Bitcoin Core GUI, you will need several libraries installed. All of them should be available in all major recently-released Linux distributions, but they may not be installed on your computer yet. To determine whether you’re missing any libraries, open a terminal (if you haven’t already) and run the directive /usr/local/bin/bitcoin-qt to commence Bitcoin Core GUI.

If all the required libraries are installed, Bitcoin Core will embark. If a required library is missing, an error message similar to the following message will be displayed:

Search your distribution’s package database for the missing file missing and install package containing that file. Then re-run /usr/local/bin/bitcoin-qt to see if it’s missing another file. Repeat until Bitcoin Core GUI starts.

You will be prompted to choose a directory to store the Bitcoin block chain and your wallet. Unless you have a separate partition or drive you want to use, click Ok to use the default.

Bitcoin Core GUI will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several days, and it may take much more time on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time by closing it; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you begin it.

After download is finish, you may use Bitcoin Core as your wallet or you can just let it run to help support the Bitcoin network.

Optional: Embark Your Knot At Login

Beginning your knot automatically each time you login to your computer makes it effortless for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to tell Bitcoin Core GUI to commence at login. This only works in desktop environments that support the autostart specification, such as Gnome, KDE, and Unity.

While running Bitcoin Core GUI, open the Settings menu and choose Options. On the Main tab, click Commence Bitcoin on system login. Click the Ok button to save the fresh settings.

The next time you login to your desktop, Bitcoin Core GUI should be automatically commenced in as an icon in the tray.

If Bitcoin Core GUI does not automatically embark, you may need to add it to an .xinit or .xsession file as described here.

You have now finished installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.

To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to permit incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.

Bitcoin Core Daemon

If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (This can be a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.) If you switched users in a graphical interface, commence a terminal.

Type the following directive:

It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is kicking off. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the guideline bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin directive line interface).

Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to begin, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli :

After it starts, you may find the following directions useful for basic interaction with your knot: getblockchaininfo , getnetworkinfo , getnettotals , getwalletinfo , stop , and help .

For example, to securely stop your knot, run the following directive:

A accomplish list of guidelines is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.

When Bitcoin Core daemon very first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several days, and it may take much more time on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop directive; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you begin it.

Optional: Commence Your Knot At Boot

Kicking off your knot automatically each time your computer boots makes it effortless for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to embark Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab on most distributions, run the following instruction:

Scroll to the bottom of the file displayed and add the following line:

Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. On most distributions, this will cause Bitcoin Core daemon to be automatically began each time your reboot your computer.

If you’re a accomplished system administrator and want to use an init script instead, see the init scripts directory in Bitcoin Core’s source tree.

You have now ended installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.

To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to permit incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.

Windows Instructions

Windows Ten

*Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.14.Two on Windows Ten

Go to the Bitcoin Core download page and verify you have made a secure connection to the server.

Click the large blue Download Bitcoin Core button to download the Bitcoin Core installer to your desktop.

Optional: Verify the release signatures

If you know how to use PGP, you should also click the Verify Release Signatures link on the download page to download a signed list of SHA256 file hashes. The 0.11 and later releases are signed by Wladimir J. van der Laan’s releases key with the fingerprint:

Earlier releases were signed by Wladimir J. van der Laan’s regular key. That key’s fingerprint is:

Even earlier releases were signed by Gavin Andresen’s key. His primary key’s fingerprint is:

You should verify these keys belong to their owners using the web of trust or other trustworthy means. Then use PGP to verify the signature on the release signatures file. Eventually, use PGP or another utility to compute the SHA256 hash of the archive you downloaded, and ensure the computed hash matches the hash listed in the verified release signatures file.

After downloading the file to your desktop or your Downloads folder ( C:\Users\<YOUR USER NAME>\Downloads ), run it by double-clicking its icon. Windows will ask you to confirm that you want to run it. Click Yes and the Bitcoin installer will begin. It’s a typical Windows installer, and it will guide you through the decisions you need to make about where to install Bitcoin Core.

To proceed, choose one of the following options

If you want to use the Bitcoin Core Graphical User Interface (GUI), proceed to the Bitcoin Core GUI section below.

If you want to use the Bitcoin Core daemon (bitcoind), which is useful for programmers and advanced users, proceed to the Bitcoin Core Daemon section below.

To want to use both the GUI and the daemon, read both the GUI instructions and the daemon instructions. Note that you can’t run both the GUI and the daemon at the same time using the same configuration directory.

Bitcoin Core GUI

Press the Windows key ( ⊞ Win ) and embark typing “bitcoin”. When the Bitcoin Core icon shows up (as shown below), click on it.

You will be prompted to choose a directory to store the Bitcoin block chain and your wallet. Unless you have a separate partition or drive you want to use, click Ok to use the default.

Your firewall may block Bitcoin Core from making outbound connections. It’s safe to permit Bitcoin Core to use all networks. (Note: you will still need to configure inbound connections as described later in the Network Configuration section.)

Bitcoin Core GUI will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several days, and it may take much more time on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time by closing it; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you begin it.

After download is finish, you may use Bitcoin Core as your wallet or you can just let it run to help support the Bitcoin network.

Optional: Embark Your Knot At Login

Beginning your knot automatically each time you login to your computer makes it effortless for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to tell Bitcoin Core GUI to embark at login.

While running Bitcoin Core GUI, open the Settings menu and choose Options. On the Main tab, click Begin Bitcoin on system login. Click the Ok button to save the fresh settings.

The next time you login to your desktop, Bitcoin Core GUI will be automatically began minimized in the task bar.

Warning: to prevent data corruption, do not force shutdown your computer from the Windows shutdown screen when you have Bitcoin Core running.

You have now ended installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.

To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to permit incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.

Bitcoin Core Daemon

To embark Bitcoin Core daemon, very first open a guideline window: press the Windows key ( ⊞ Win ) and type “cmd”. Choose the option labeled “Command Prompt”.

If you installed Bitcoin Core into the default directory, type the following at the guideline prompt:

Bitcoin Core daemon should begin and print a message that Bitcoin Core is embarking.

To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the instruction bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin guideline line interface). If you installed Bitcoin Core into the default location, type the following at the instruction prompt to see whether it works:

Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to commence, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli :

After it starts, you may find the following directions useful for basic interaction with your knot: getblockchaininfo , getnetworkinfo , getnettotals , getwalletinfo , stop , and help .

For example, to securely stop your knot, run the following instruction:

A accomplish list of guidelines is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.

When Bitcoin Core daemon very first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several days, and it may take much more time on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop guideline; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you commence it.

Optional: Commence Your Knot At Boot

Commencing your knot automatically each time your computer boots makes it effortless for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to embark Bitcoin Core daemon when you login to your computer.

Embark File Explorer and go to,

Right-click on the File Explorer window and choose Fresh → Text file. Name the file start_bitcoind.bat . Then right-click on it and choose Open in Notepad (or whatever editor you choose). Copy and paste the following line into the file.

(If you installed Bitcoin Core in a non-default directory, use that directory path instead.)

Save the file. The next time you login to your computer, Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically embarked.

Warning: to prevent data corruption, do not force shutdown your computer from the Windows shutdown screen when you have Bitcoin Core running.

You have now ended installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.

To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to permit incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.

Windows 8.x

Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.14.Two on Windows eight and 8.1.

Go to the Bitcoin Core download page and verify you have made a secure connection to the server.

Click the large blue Download Bitcoin Core button to download the Bitcoin Core installer to your desktop.

Optional: Verify the release signatures

If you know how to use PGP, you should also click the Verify Release Signatures link on the download page to download a signed list of SHA256 file hashes. The 0.11 and later releases are signed by Wladimir J. van der Laan’s releases key with the fingerprint:

Earlier releases were signed by Wladimir J. van der Laan’s regular key. That key’s fingerprint is:

Even earlier releases were signed by Gavin Andresen’s key. His primary key’s fingerprint is:

You should verify these keys belong to their owners using the web of trust or other trustworthy means. Then use PGP to verify the signature on the release signatures file. Eventually, use PGP or another utility to compute the SHA256 hash of the archive you downloaded, and ensure the computed hash matches the hash listed in the verified release signatures file.

After downloading the file to your desktop or your Downloads folder ( C:\Users\<YOUR USER NAME>\Downloads ), run it by double-clicking its icon. Windows will ask you to confirm that you want to run it. Click Yes and the Bitcoin installer will begin. It’s a typical Windows installer, and it will guide you through the decisions you need to make about where to install Bitcoin Core.

To proceed, choose one of the following options

If you want to use the Bitcoin Core Graphical User Interface (GUI), proceed to the Bitcoin Core GUI section below.

If you want to use the Bitcoin Core daemon (bitcoind), which is useful for programmers and advanced users, proceed to the Bitcoin Core Daemon section below.

To want to use both the GUI and the daemon, read both the GUI instructions and the daemon instructions. Note that you can’t run both the GUI and the daemon at the same time using the same configuration directory.

Bitcoin Core GUI

Press the Windows key ( ⊞ Win ) and commence typing “bitcoin”. When the Bitcoin Core icon shows up (as shown below), click on it.

You will be prompted to choose a directory to store the Bitcoin block chain and your wallet. Unless you have a separate partition or drive you want to use, click Ok to use the default.

Your firewall may block Bitcoin Core from making outbound connections. It’s safe to permit Bitcoin Core to use all networks. (Note: you will still need to configure inbound connections as described later in the Network Configuration section.)

Bitcoin Core GUI will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several days, and it may take much more time on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time by closing it; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you commence it.

After download is accomplish, you may use Bitcoin Core as your wallet or you can just let it run to help support the Bitcoin network.

Optional: Commence Your Knot At Login

Commencing your knot automatically each time you login to your computer makes it effortless for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to tell Bitcoin Core GUI to commence at login.

While running Bitcoin Core GUI, open the Settings menu and choose Options. On the Main tab, click Commence Bitcoin on system login. Click the Ok button to save the fresh settings.

The next time you login to your desktop, Bitcoin Core GUI will be automatically commenced minimized in the task bar.

Warning: to prevent data corruption, do not force shutdown your computer from the Windows shutdown screen when you have Bitcoin Core running.

You have now finished installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.

To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to permit incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.

Bitcoin Core Daemon

To embark Bitcoin Core daemon, very first open a guideline window: press the Windows key ( ⊞ Win ) and type “cmd”. Choose the option labeled “Command Prompt”.

If you installed Bitcoin Core into the default directory, type the following at the instruction prompt:

Bitcoin Core daemon should embark and print a message that Bitcoin Core is embarking.

To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the instruction bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin guideline line interface). If you installed Bitcoin Core into the default location, type the following at the directive prompt to see whether it works:

Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to begin, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli :

After it starts, you may find the following instructions useful for basic interaction with your knot: getblockchaininfo , getnetworkinfo , getnettotals , getwalletinfo , stop , and help .

For example, to securely stop your knot, run the following instruction:

A finish list of directions is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.

When Bitcoin Core daemon very first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several days, and it may take much more time on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop directive; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you commence it.

Optional: Commence Your Knot At Boot

Embarking your knot automatically each time your computer boots makes it effortless for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to commence Bitcoin Core daemon when you login to your computer.

Begin File Explorer and go to,

Right-click on the File Explorer window and choose Fresh → Text file. Name the file start_bitcoind.bat . Then right-click on it and choose Open in Notepad (or whatever editor you choose). Copy and paste the following line into the file.

(If you installed Bitcoin Core in a non-default directory, use that directory path instead.)

Save the file. The next time you login to your computer, Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically embarked.

Warning: to prevent data corruption, do not force shutdown your computer from the Windows shutdown screen when you have Bitcoin Core running.

You have now ended installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.

To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to permit incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.

Windows 7

*Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.14.Two

Go to the Bitcoin Core download page and verify you have made a secure connection to the server.

Click the large blue Download Bitcoin Core button to download the Bitcoin Core installer to your desktop.

Optional: Verify the release signatures

If you know how to use PGP, you should also click the Verify Release Signatures link on the download page to download a signed list of SHA256 file hashes. The 0.11 and later releases are signed by Wladimir J. van der Laan’s releases key with the fingerprint:

Earlier releases were signed by Wladimir J. van der Laan’s regular key. That key’s fingerprint is:

Even earlier releases were signed by Gavin Andresen’s key. His primary key’s fingerprint is:

You should verify these keys belong to their owners using the web of trust or other trustworthy means. Then use PGP to verify the signature on the release signatures file. Ultimately, use PGP or another utility to compute the SHA256 hash of the archive you downloaded, and ensure the computed hash matches the hash listed in the verified release signatures file.

After downloading the file to your desktop or your Downloads folder ( C:\Users\<YOUR USER NAME>\Downloads ), run it by double-clicking its icon. Windows will ask you to confirm that you want to run it. Click Yes and the Bitcoin installer will embark. It’s a typical Windows installer, and it will guide you through the decisions you need to make about where to install Bitcoin Core.

To proceed, choose one of the following options

If you want to use the Bitcoin Core Graphical User Interface (GUI), proceed to the Bitcoin Core GUI section below.

If you want to use the Bitcoin Core daemon (bitcoind), which is useful for programmers and advanced users, proceed to the Bitcoin Core Daemon section below.

To want to use both the GUI and the daemon, read both the GUI instructions and the daemon instructions. Note that you can’t run both the GUI and the daemon at the same time using the same configuration directory.

Bitcoin Core GUI

Open the Commence menu, type bitcoin into the search box, and click the Bitcoin Core icon.

You will be prompted to choose a directory to store the Bitcoin block chain and your wallet. Unless you have a separate partition or drive you want to use, click Ok to use the default.

Your firewall may block Bitcoin Core from making outbound connections. It’s safe to permit Bitcoin Core to use all networks. (Note: you will still need to configure inbound connections as described later in the Network Configuration section.)

Bitcoin Core GUI will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several days, and it may take much more time on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time by closing it; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you commence it.

After download is finish, you may use Bitcoin Core as your wallet or you can just let it run to help support the Bitcoin network.

Optional: Begin Your Knot At Login

Embarking your knot automatically each time you login to your computer makes it effortless for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to tell Bitcoin Core GUI to commence at login.

While running Bitcoin Core GUI, open the Settings menu and choose Options. On the Main tab, click Begin Bitcoin on system login. Click the Ok button to save the fresh settings.

The next time you login to your desktop, Bitcoin Core GUI will be automatically embarked minimized in the task bar.

Warning: to prevent data corruption, do not force shutdown your computer from the Windows shutdown screen when you have Bitcoin Core running.

You have now finished installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.

To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to permit incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.

Bitcoin Core Daemon

To begin Bitcoin Core daemon, very first open a guideline window: press the Windows key ( ⊞ Win ) and type “cmd”. Choose the program named “cmd.exe”

If you installed the Bitcoin Core into the default directory, type the following at the directive prompt :

Bitcoin Core daemon should embark.

You can now attempt using Bitcoin Cli Utility.

To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the instruction bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin instruction line interface). If you installed Bitcoin Core into the default location, type the following at the instruction prompt to see whether it works:

Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to begin, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli :

After it starts, you may find the following guidelines useful for basic interaction with your knot: getblockchaininfo , getnetworkinfo , getnettotals , getwalletinfo , stop , and help .

For example, to securely stop your knot, run the following directive:

A accomplish list of instructions is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.

When Bitcoin Core daemon very first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several days, and it may take much more time on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop guideline; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you begin it.

When Bitcoin Core daemon very first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several days, and it may take much more time on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop guideline; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you commence it.

Optional: Commence Your Knot At Boot

Beginning your knot automatically each time your computer boots makes it effortless for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to embark Bitcoin Core daemon when you login to your computer.

Commence File Explorer and go to,

You can also access this folder by executing the following guideline after reaching the Execute. prompt :

Right-click on the File Explorer window and choose Fresh → Text file. Name the file start_bitcoind.bat . Then right-click on it and choose Open in Notepad (or whatever editor you choose). Copy and paste the following line into the file.

(If you installed Bitcoin Core in a non-default directory, use that directory path instead.)

Save the file. The next time you login to your computer, Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically began.

Warning: to prevent data corruption, do not force shutdown your computer from the Windows shutdown screen when you have Bitcoin Core running.

You have now ended installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.

To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to permit incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.

Mac OS X Instructions

Mac OS X Yosemite Ten.Ten.x

Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.14.Two on Mac OS X Yosemite

Go to the Bitcoin Core download page and verify you have made a secure connection to the server.

Click the large blue Download Bitcoin Core button to download the Bitcoin Core installer to your Downloads folder.

Optional: Verify the release signatures

If you know how to use PGP, you should also click the Verify Release Signatures link on the download page to download a signed list of SHA256 file hashes. The 0.11 and later releases are signed by Wladimir J. van der Laan’s releases key with the fingerprint:

Earlier releases were signed by Wladimir J. van der Laan’s regular key. That key’s fingerprint is:

Even earlier releases were signed by Gavin Andresen’s key. His primary key’s fingerprint is:

You should verify these keys belong to their owners using the web of trust or other trustworthy means. Then use PGP to verify the signature on the release signatures file. Ultimately, use PGP or another utility to compute the SHA256 hash of the archive you downloaded, and ensure the computed hash matches the hash listed in the verified release signatures file.

After downloading the file to your Downloads folder ( /Users/<YOUR USER NAME>/Downloads ), run it by double-clicking its icon. OS X will open a Finder window for you to haul Bitcoin Core to your Applications folder.

Bitcoin Core GUI

The very first time running Bitcoin Core, Max OS X will ask you to confirm that you want to run it:

You will be prompted to choose a directory to store the Bitcoin block chain and your wallet. Unless you have a separate partition or drive you want to use, click Ok to use the default.

Bitcoin Core GUI will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several days, and it may take much more time on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time by closing it; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you embark it.

After download is finish, you may use Bitcoin Core as your wallet or you can just let it run to help support the Bitcoin network.

Optional: Commence Your Knot At Login

Beginning your knot automatically each time you login to your computer makes it effortless for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to tell Bitcoin Core GUI to commence at login.

While running Bitcoin Core GUI, open the Bitcoin Core menu and choose Preferences. On the Main tab, click Embark Bitcoin on system login. Click the Ok button to save the fresh settings.

The next time you login to your desktop, Bitcoin Core GUI will be automatically began minimized in the task bar.

You have now finished installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.

To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to permit incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.

Bitcoin Core Daemon

The Bitcoin Core daemon (bitcoind) is not included in the .dmg file you may have downloaded to install Bitcoin-QT. Bitcoind, along with its support binaries, is instead included in the OS X .tar.gz file listed on the official Bitcoin Core download page. To download this file using Terminal, execute the following directive:

Optional: Verify the release signatures

If you know how to use PGP, you should also click the Verify Release Signatures link on the download page to download a signed list of SHA256 file hashes. The 0.11 and later releases are signed by Wladimir J. van der Laan’s releases key with the fingerprint:

Earlier releases were signed by Wladimir J. van der Laan’s regular key. That key’s fingerprint is:

Even earlier releases were signed by Gavin Andresen’s key. His primary key’s fingerprint is:

You should verify these keys belong to their owners using the web of trust or other trustworthy means. Then use PGP to verify the signature on the release signatures file. Eventually, use PGP or another utility to compute the SHA256 hash of the archive you downloaded, and ensure the computed hash matches the hash listed in the verified release signatures file.

Extract bitcoind and its support binaries from the archive we just downloaded by running this directive in Terminal:

Now we’ll stir the executables into your default path to make running and stopping bitcoind lighter. To stir the executables, run these directives (note that we have to use sudo to perform these directives since we are modifying directories wielded by root):

To clean up the directory we’ve been working in, run:

You should now be able to embark up your utter knot by running bitcoind -daemon in any Terminal window. If you need to stop bitcoind for any reason, the instruction is bitcoin-cli stop

Optional: Commence Your Knot At Login

Commencing your knot automatically each time you login to your computer makes it effortless for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to tell Bitcoin Core Daemon to commence at login. In OS X, the way to embark background programs at login is using a Launch Agent. Here is how to install a Launch Agent for Bitcoin Core daemon on your machine:

The next time you login to your desktop, Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically commenced.

You have now finished installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.

To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to permit incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.

Upgrading Bitcoin Core

If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has entirely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), then run the installer (on Windows) or just copy over /Applications/Bitcoin-Qt (on Mac) or bitcoind/bitcoin-qt (on Linux).

The blockchain and wallet files in the data directory are compatible inbetween versions so there is no requirement to make any switches to the data directory when upgrading. Sometimes the format of those files switches, but the fresh Bitcoin Core version will include code that automatically upgrades the files to the fresh format so no manual intervention is required.

Sometimes upgrade of the blockchain data files from very old versions to the fresh versions is not supported. In those cases it may be necessary to redownload the blockchain. Check the release notes of the fresh version if you are planning to upgrade from a very old version.

Sometimes downgrade is not possible because of switches to the data files. Again, check the release notes for the fresh version if you are planning to downgrade.

Network Configuration

If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must permit inbound connections.

When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes eight outbound connections to other total knots so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your utter knot as a wallet, you don’t need more than these eight connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other total knots on the network, you must permit inbound connections.

Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based knot accepts inbound connections.

Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to permit inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unluckily many routers don’t permit automatic configuration, so you must by hand configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to permit inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.

Testing Connections

The BitNodes project provides an online device to let you test whether your knot accepts inbound connections. To use it, begin Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait ten minutes, and then visit the Bitnodes page. The contraption will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to come in your address by hand.

After you press Check Knot, the contraption will inform you whether your port is open (green box) or not open (crimson box). If you get the green box, you don’t need to do anything—you accept inbound connections. If you get the crimson box, please read the enabling connections subsection.

For confirmation that you accept inbound connections, you can use Bitcoin Core. Bitcoin Core can’t tell you directly whether you permit inbound connections, but it can tell you whether or not you presently have any inbound connections. If your knot has been online for at least thirty minutes, it should normally have inbound connections. If want to check your peer info using Bitcoin Core, choose the adequate instructions below:

GUI Peer Info

In the bottom right corner of the Bitcoin Core GUI are several icons. If you hover over the signal strength icon, it will tell you how many connections you have. The icon won’t turn green until you have more than eight active connections, which only happens if inbound connections are permitted.

For confirmation, you can go to the Help menu, choose Debug Window, and open the Information tab. In the Network section, it will tell you exactly how many inbound connections you have. If the number is greater than zero, then inbound connections are permitted.

If you don’t have inbound connections, please read the instructions for enabling inbound connections.

Daemon Peer Info

The getconnectioncount instruction will tell you how many connections you have. If you have more than eight connections, inbound connections are permitted. For example:

For confirmation, you can use the getpeerinfo guideline to get information about all of your peers. Each peer’s details will include an inbound field set to true if the connection is inbound. If you have any inbound connections, then inbound connections are permitted.

If you don’t have inbound connections, please read instructions for enabling inbound connections.

Enabling Connections

If Bitcoin Core can’t automatically configure your router to open port 8333, you will need to by hand configure your router. We’ve attempted to make the following instructions generic enough to cover most router models; if you need specific help with your router, please ask for help on a tech support site such as SuperUser.

Enabling inbound connections requires two steps, plus an extra third step for firewall users:

Providing your computer a static (unchanging) internal IP address by configuring the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) on your router.

Forwarding inbound connections from the Internet through your router to your computer where Bitcoin Core can process them.

Configuring your firewall to permit inbound connections. This step mainly applies to Windows users, as Mac OS X and most Linuxes do not enable a firewall by default.

Configuring DHCP

In order for your router to direct incoming port eight thousand three hundred thirty three connections to your computer, it needs to know your computer’s internal IP address. However, routers usually give computers dynamic IP addresses that switch frequently, so we need to ensure your router always gives your computer the same internal IP address.

Begin by logging into your router’s administration interface. Most routers can be configured using one of the following URLs, so keep clicking links until you find one that works. If none work, consult your router’s manual.

Upon connecting, you will very likely be prompted for a username and password. If you configured a password, come in it now. If not, the Router Passwords site provides a database of known default username and password pairs.

After logging in, you want to search your router’s menus for options related to DHCP, the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. These options may also be called Address Reservation. For example, the router page shown below calls the option we need “DHCP Reservation”:

In the reservation configuration, some routers will display a list of computers and devices presently connected to your network, and then let you select a device to make its current IP address permanent:

If that’s the case, find the computer running Bitcoin Core in the list, select it, and add it to the list of reserved addresses. Make a note of its current IP address—we’ll use the address in the next section.

Other routers require a more manual configuration. For these routers, you will need to look up the immobilized address (MAC address) for your computer’s network card and add it to the list. This operation differs by operating system:

Windows seven & 8: Press Win-R (Windows key plus the R key) to open the Run dialog. Type cmd to open the console. Type ipconfig /all and find the result that best matches your connection—usually a wireless connection. Look for a line that starts with “Physical Address” and contains a value like this:

Substitute all the dashes with colons, so the address looks like this: 01:23:45:67:89:AB. Use that address in the instructions below.

Linux: open a terminal and type ifconfig . Find the result that best matches your connection—a result commencing with wlan indicates a wireless connection. Find the field that starts with HWaddr and copy the instantly following field that looks like 01:23:45:67:89:ab. Use that value in the instructions below.

Mac OS X: open a terminal and type ifconfig . Find the result that best matches your connection—a result kicking off with en1 usually indicates a wireless connection. Find the field that starts with ether: and copy the instantly following field that looks like 01:23:45:67:89:ab. Use that value in the instructions below.

Once you have the MAC address, you can pack it into to your router’s manual DHCP assignment table, as illustrated below. Also choose an IP address and make a note of it for the instructions in the next subsection. After injecting this information, click the Add or Save button.

Then reboot your computer to ensure it gets assigned the address you selected and proceed to the Port Forwarding instructions below.

Port Forwarding

For this step, you need to know the local IP address of the computer running Bitcoin Core. You should have this information from configuring the DHCP assignment table in the subsection above.

Login to your router using the same steps described near the top of the DHCP subsection. Look for an option called Port Forwarding, Port Assignment, or anything with “Port” in its name. On the some routers, this option is buried in an Applications & Gaming menu.

The port forwarding settings should permit you to map an outer port on your router to the “internal port” of a device on your network as shown in the screenshot below.

Both the outward port and the internal port should be eight thousand three hundred thirty three for Bitcoin. (You may also want to map port eighteen thousand three hundred thirty three for Bitcoin’s testnet, albeit this guide does not cover using testnet.) Make sure the IP address you inject is the same one you configured in the previous subsection.

After packing in the details for the mapping, save the entry. You should not need to restart anything. Commence Bitcoin Core (if you haven’t already) and go after the Testing Connections instructions to test your connection.

If you still can’t connect and you use a firewall, you very likely need to switch your firewall settings. See the Firewall section below.

If something else went wrong, it’s very likely a problem with your router configuration. Re-read the instructions above to see if you missed anything, search the web for help with “port forwarding”, and ask for help on sites like SuperUser.

We can’t provide direct support, but if you see a way to improve these instructions, please open an issue.

Firewall Configuration

Firewalls block inbound connections. To use Bitcoin, you need to configure your computer’s firewall to permit connections to port 8333. This is usually as effortless as beginning your firewall configuration software and defining a fresh rule to permit inbound connections to port 8333. For extra information for Windows, see the links below:

Mac OS X comes with its firewall disabled by default, but if you have enabled it, see the section Permitting Specific Applications from the official Apple guide.

Ubuntu also comes with its firewall disabled by default, but if you have enabled it, see the Ubuntu wiki page for information about adding port forwarding rules.

Once you have permitted inbound connections to port 8333, begin Bitcoin Core (if you haven’t already) and go after the Testing Connections instructions to test your connection.

If something else went wrong re-read the DHCP, port forwarding, and firewall instructions above to see if you missed anything, search the web for help with “port forwarding” and “opening firewall ports”, and ask for help on sites like SuperUser.

We can’t provide direct support, but if you see a way to improve these instructions, please open an issue.

Configuration Tuning

This section contains advice about how to switch your Bitcoin Core configuration to adapt it to your needs.

There are two ways to switch your configuration. The very first is to begin Bitcoin Core with the options you want. For example, if you want to limit it to using one CPU core for signature verification, you can begin Bitcoin Core like this:

Once you’ve determined you like an option, you can add it to the Bitcoin Core configuration file. You can find that file in the following directories:

OSX: $HOME/Library/Application Support/Bitcoin/

To add an option to the configuration file, just eliminate its leading dash. You may also need to eliminate any quotation marks you used in your shell. For example, the -par option seen above would look like this in the configuration file:

A user-friendly configuration file generator is available here. If you have any questions about configuring Bitcoin Core, please stop by one of our forums or live chatrooms.

Reduce Storage

It is possible to configure your knot to to run in pruned mode in order to reduce storage requirements. This can reduce the disk usage from over 145GB to around 5GB.

Running a knot in pruned mode is incompatible with -txindex and -rescan . It also disables the RPC importwallet . Two RPCs that are available and potentially helpful, however, are importprunedfunds and removeprunedfunds .

To enable block pruning set prune=N on the directive line or in bitcoin.conf , where N is the number of MiB to allot for raw block and undo data.

A value of zero disables pruning. The minimal value above zero is five hundred fifty . Your wallet is as secure with high values as it is with low ones. Higher values merely ensure that your knot will not shut down upon blockchain reorganizations of more than two days – which are unlikely to happen in practice. In future releases, a higher value may also help the network as a entire because stored blocks could be served to other knots.

Reduce Traffic

Some knot operators need to deal with bandwidth caps imposed by their ISPs.

By default, bitcoin-core permits up to one hundred twenty five connections to different peers, eight of which are outbound. You can therefore, have at most one hundred seventeen inbound connections.

The default settings can result in relatively significant traffic consumption.

Ways to reduce traffic:

Maximum Upload Targets

A major component of the traffic is caused by serving historic blocks to other knots during the initial blocks download phase (syncing up a fresh knot). This option can be specified in MiB per day and is turned off by default. This is not a hard limit; only a threshold to minimize the outbound traffic. When the limit is about to be reached, the uploaded data is cut by no longer serving historic blocks (blocks older than one week). Keep in mind that fresh knots require other knots that are willing to serve historic blocks. The recommended minimum is one hundred forty four blocks per day (max. 144MB per day)

Disable listening

Disabling listening will result in fewer knots connected (recall the maximum of eight outbound peers). Fewer knots will result in less traffic usage as you are relaying blocks and transactions to fewer knots.

Reduce maximum connections

Reducing the maximum connected knots to a minimum could be desirable if traffic boundaries are lil’. Keep in mind that bitcoin’s trustless model works best if you are connected to a handful of knots.

Blocks-only mode

Causes your knot to stop requesting and relaying transactions unless they are part of a block and also disables listening as described above.

This reduces your node’s bandwidth to the absolute minimum necessary to stay synchronized with the network, about one hundred fifty megabytes incoming data per day and about one megabyte of outgoing data per day, but it does mean that your knot won’t see incoming transactions until they’ve received at least one confirmation.

You will still be able to send transactions from the built-in wallet or from peers you’ve whitelisted using the -whitelist parameter.

Related video:

Leave a Reply